Mertani is conducting a project to test the accuracy of Hardware Communication by conducting a Proof of Concept (POC) at a palm oil plantation company in Sumatera. Accuracy monitoring is carried out by adjusting the needs of palm oil plantations. In this case, palm oil plantations want a wide range of GPS and a data transmission system that can transmit large amounts of data.

The benefits of improving GPS quality and data retrieval are used to expand the range in
monitoring harvesters’ locations and also to facilitate the collection of harvest data. The determination of the location range is still evaluated until it reaches the desired range. Location determination using GPS has equipped with Low Power Wide Area Network (LoRaWAN) technology facilitated by Tuni.

Tuni as a Mertani partner that facilitates connectivity in remote areas already has LoRa
technology with a range of approximately 11 km. With this evaluation and development through the POC, Mertani and Tuni develop their coverage by adjusting land conditions. The technology developed in this project is in the form of a modem and is easily carried by harvesters. There are buttons to count yields that can be done directly on the land.

The development of Low Power Wide Area Network (LoRaWAN) technology in Indonesia is still relatively new and is a big challenge to apply it directly to land. Adjusting regulations with technology is a challenge currently being carried out in this project. Optimal results in the Hardware Communication test are expected to help managers optimally monitor yields and harvest efficiency.

Smart Farming: IOT-Based Technology

Smart farming is the application of modern Information and Communication Technology (IT) in the agriculture section, which combines precision equipment, the Internet of Things (IoT), sensors and actuators, geographical positioning systems, Big Data, robotics, etc. On the other hand, the Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept where an object can transfer data through a network without requiring human-to-human or human-computer interaction. Indonesia as an agricultural country that produces and consumes agricultural products will be greatly helped to obtain large quantities of food supply and solve agricultural problems efficiently. The Internet of Things, with real-time (accurate time), can provide changes to the agricultural supply chain and provide technology that makes the supplying process of agricultural logistics runs smoothly.

Using Smart Farming Technology: Why We Should Adopt It

Smart Farming is very suitable to be implemented in agriculture because of its’ characteristics. In Plantation contex, smart farming elaborated as precision agriculture. Precision agriculture is application of technology and cultivation principle that adjusted accuration in agriculture production aspect. Precision agriculture can strengthen management system, evaluation, and monitoring plantation. Through precision agriculture, plantation companies will be greatly helped to make the right decisions based on real-time data about things that can affect crop production: weather forecasts, soil conditions, potential pest presence, and market needs for certain crops. Second, it helps to use resources effectively with the presence of nutrients and water detectors and systems that allow agricultural production operations including fertilizing, spraying pests and harvesting to be done by real-time machines or equipment. The final result are the increasing of crop productivity, efficient use of water, fertilizers, and pesticides, which ultimately keeps food prices down or stable, reduces the negative impact of agriculture on ecosystems by reducing waste to rivers and groundwater, and increases worker’s safety.

Is It Possible to Utilize Smart Farming In Indonesia: Potential, Regulation, and The Future

According to the Ministry of Communication and Information Technology (Kemkominfo), the application of smart farming has great potential for the agricultural sector in Indonesia. Even so, to implement IoT thoroughly in every Indonesia region, it requires adequate internet infrastructure. Considering that most farmers who are not yet technologically savvy, new technopreneur-oriented millennial actors as well as sociopreneur actors will be needed to consolidate traditional farmers, and facilitate the application and new technology. Every farmer household doesn’t need to have a drone to monitor crop growth, fertilization, and harvest area, but the role of local government, NGOs, and universities are important to facilitate the use of drones and various other 4.0 technologies for this purpose.